Category Archives: raspberrypi

#Picademy!

picademy_cohort
The whole crew, complete with jazz hands.

Just spent a weekend in Baltimore at #picademy, a 2-day workshop presented by the Raspberry Pi Foundation for 40 teachers. And I have to say it’s near the top of a lifetime of PD experiences. Amazing instructors, an inspiring venue (shout out to the Digital Harbor Foundation), and a cohort of 40 enthusiastic, dedicated, funny, thoughtful, creative teachers. Couldn’t ask for more!

bob_computer_picademy
A picture of me taking a picture….

And school starts this week! I have 20 brand new Raspberry Pi’s, thanks to the generosity of the parents group at the Porter-Gaud School, and I can’t wait to get these Pi’s cranking!

What I hoped to get from Picademy was some practical ways to introduce the Pi’s and some ideas for extending Pi skills in the class. Whoa! I got all that and more! And in the best way possible… by experience. We were thrown in the deep end, coding Sonic Pi, Minecraft, lighting LED’s with Scratch and Python…. and even though I had some experience with some of this, I was challenged and inspired. The great thing was to see people with no background in computer science jumping in and trying to make new and cool stuff. On the second day, we have 5 hours to come up with something original. My amazing partner @scratch_boulder (Mai) and I made a Minecraft phonebooth that was triggered by a button or motion sensor, took a selfie, and then built that selfie in the Minecraft world. So much fun!

mc_selfie
Our selfie worked! Props to @scratch_boulder for being such a great partner!

And now on back to Charleston. Tonight is back-to-school night for the middle school, with games and general mayhem in the gym. School starts For Real in a few days.

But I hope to keep that spark alive and stay in contact with my new tribe. Once more into the breach!

Planning the Raspberry Pi invasion

raspberry-pi-logoIt’s the next to last day of school. So naturally my thoughts are on next year! I’m still in “school mode” and not in “summer mode” quite yet. Give me a few days…..

I’m planning to inject some serious Raspberry Pi goodness into my middle school curriculum next year. It’s exciting and terrifying all at once. So what’s exciting? I truly believe in the mission of the RPi Foundation…. bringing hands-on computing to students today. And I believe that the Pi is the best way forward and will bring back some of the excitement that many of us felt when personal computers were brand new.

And what’s terrifying? Truthfully, it’s the sheer magnitude of what you can do with these things.  Go through the forums, follow people on Twitter, read the MagPi magazine, and you’ll be overwhelmed with what you can do with these things: refrigerator monitors, space exploration, weather stations, Twitter feeds, Minecraft coding, live music coding, electronics, sensors, oh my! The list goes on and on.

Fortunately I ran a Creation Station club this year, where I got students to experiment with various projects on the Pi (among other things), so I have some ideas of what might work. I’ve got 20 Pi 3’s, and 20 Sense HATs. I figure that right there should give us enough to play with for year one. I also have an assortment of one-off pieces: floras, cameras, etc. So any of those might spark serious interest, too.

Along with those ideas, I’m also working on logistics — where do I store them, how do I share them between classes, how do I back up student work, how do we run them in our iMac lab…..

Stay tuned for further updates over the summer! Also hoping to be chosen for August’s Picademy in Baltimore!

Wearing Different HATs

If you’re a Raspberry Pi fan, you already got the joke. If not, well…… a HAT for a Raspberry Pi is Hardware Attached to Top. Get it? OK, it’s geeky humor…

skywriterAnyway, I just got three brand-new HATs to play with: the Pimoroni Skywriter HAT, the Piano HAT, and an LCD touchscreen (Pi-size). I’ve only had the chance to play a bit with the Skywriter, which has near-field 3D gesture detection (think I got that right), and I’m dying to get that X-Wing built in Minecraft and then fly it by hand gestures above the HAT. I spent about an hour, getting the Skywriter library, trying to use some code (here’s the project: http://robotsandphysicalcomputing.blogspot.com/2016/01/guesture-controlled-minecraft-x-wing.html), finding it needs an extra Minecraft Pi library called minecraftstuff, figuring out where the minecraft api on the Jessie distro is…. so I’m still grounded. However, we’ll be taking off next week for sure!

Pimoroni-Piano-Raspberry-Pi-HAT-1The Piano HAT allows you to “play” the piano on your Pi. The really cool thing is that you can do all kinds of music with it, but you can also code the keys to do anything else you want — make weird noises, turn lights on and off, turn motors on and off…. Can’t wait to play with that one!

And the LCD screen frees you from a monitor and keyboard for your Pi. I personally find it just too tiny for my eyeballs, but I can see it working with an embedded Pi doing all kinds of cool things — retro gaming, a DJ system….

Did I mention I’m also diving into using Sonic Pi (live music coding) in Minecraft? The Sonic Pi api includes some Minecraft stuff (written in Ruby), so you can lay down some beats with Sonic Pi, then build stuff as you move around in Minecraft, synchronized together! It’s just too cool for words.

So I’m getting ready for next year’s classes when we move much of my curriculum over to the Raspberry Pi. Look out!

Coding in Minecraft redux

aim.bookI’ve spent a good part of this quarter in my 8th grade classes trying out some ways to code in Minecraft, as you know if you’ve been following this blog.  See below for various attempts and approaches. I’ve looked at command blocks, LearntoMod, ComputerCraft (using Lua), ScriptCraft (using Javascript), Youth Digital’s Modding in Minecraft (using Java(!))…. They’ve all got features to recommend them, and I’m sure any of them would be awesome in the right situation. I’m not making any blanket thumbs-ups or thumbs-downs.

But here’s what worked best in my class —- something I got from the book Adventures in Minecraft by Martin O’Hanlon and David Whale.  It’s an amalgam of Python, Minecraft, the Bukkit server, and Raspberry Pi. This odd little mutt suited my purposes really well. I call it Mython.

Technical details — you can get a folder with everything you need here, which includes the Bukkit server and the Minecraft/Python API. You’ll need to run Python 2.x (so far), Minecraft 1.6.4, and the current version of Bukkit. Others have ported it to other servers (Forge and CanaryMod), Python 3.x, and more recent versions of Minecraft. I just wanted something that would run with minimal hacking on my part, as time was running out in the quarter.

I had to do some monkeying around with accounts and permissions on my lab computers, and the results required more logins than I was happy with, but that can be fixed for next year. The important thing is that I was able to achieve my goal of introducing a text-based programming environment that was accessible to my 8th graders and did some fun and cool stuff in Minecraft. Mission accomplished!

Students were able to build magic bridges, instant houses, and “draw” in luscious Minecraft 3D with turtles! And if you know me, you know I’m a big turtle fan.

Not only that, but the authors were incredibly helpful in answering questions that I posted on their forum. So yeah, you can say I’m a fan. Can’t wait to fine tune it for next year!

I asked the students how they liked it compared to the other approaches, and someone said, “It’s about 4000 times better!” Good enough for me!